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counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
at the first north american exhibit of work by china's ai wei wei. brown: antique wooden stools from the chink dynasty. a video documenting changes along a major street in beijing an ancient vase with a modern-day logo. now on display at the smithsonian's museum in washington d.c. in an exhibition called "according to what," these are the works by the chinese artist away way. a prankster who can make a tea house literally out of tea leaves and represents the surveil-camera that watches him at his home in china is a marble sculpture. he's a visionary who helped design the bird's nest stadium for the application and whose use of social media is shifting the boundaries of art and activism and a dissident. he took a picture and tweeted it even as he was being arrested in 2009. and then spent 81 days in prison, was beaten and made the x-ray image of the damage he suffered into an art work. >> for me living in today's world, if you live in china, it's very hard to do a work which is not... which does not reflect or suggest the other possibility and meanings. all the works i do which connect or refle
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
the new chain. burger king has similar joint ventures in russia, brazil, south africa and china. >> more than 14,000 dock workers on the east coast and the gulf are threatening to go on strike on sunday. brian takes a look at the impact it could have on the economy. >> they move everything from our clothes to toys and electronics through the ports and into the marketplace but a lot of the goods won't be making it to our stores in longshoreman at more than a dozen ports from main to texas go on strike. that's what could happen by sunday if a deal can't be reached between the major shipping companies and a union representing nearly 15,000 longshoremen. >> the impact would be great. obviously on the dollar value side. on the cargo handling side but also on the job side because again these sports are major economic generators. >> richard of the maryland port administrator and others say the economic damage from a strike would reach well beyond the docks. >> your mom and pop retailer to your farmer to the trucking company that has to pick up the container atmosphere the port. so not just at t
of santa's route. he follows every new year's. he just was in russia. now he's over the great wall of china. previous to that, he made his way to australia. you can see him flying past the famed opera house there. so he's delivered all of his presents in australia. all of the presents in russia. all the presents in japan, and also south korea, and, of course, now he's busy in china, on his way, of course, over here to the united states. we'll keep you posted. >>> wreaths across america. it's a program that's become part of the healing process for military families around the holidays. today's giving in focus takes a look at a tree farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little count
like china? >> well, take the robotic device . this is a medical device. under the obama care law medical devices will be subject to attacks because they have to pay for obama care. this is the sort of thing that if we keep doing will suppress the growth of technology in this country, and then there is the issue of immigration policy. a lot of this technology drefn drefn -- t driven by engineers and silicon valley has been the result of immigration in the united states. if we don't stand in front of these things we can grow. >> thank you. >>> coming up in our second half hour a look ahead to 2013.k is the economy poised for a come back, or will slow growth and high unemployment continue to drag us down? and get ready for obama care. what you need to know as some key provisions kick in. >>> it was terrifying moments at a phoenix bank. workers arrived to find one of their co-workers with a device around her neck, but the device was harmless. she was taken hostage the night before and held against her will overnight. police say the man who did it took her to the bank this morning and
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
considerable suggestion from the russians. we are also assessing what is going on with china, but it appears that there is a broadening acknowledgement that the days of a sob are nearing an end. your thoughts? >> i think this statement by russian deputy foreign minister is quite significant. this is the first visible sign the russians think that he cannot be saved. there has never been any doubt about that. if he is about to lose power throughout the country and the opposition takeover, the russians have to be very worried about their naval base, the direction and new government will take, what this means for their position in the middle east as a whole. i hope they don't decide it will go after somebody like mohammad morrissey. lou: is there any possibility in your mind what we are watching is a bit of a ruse? that there is a deal and that russia is just simply letting events transpire to persuade others that they simply lost this when in fact they have assurances from the u.s. for their naval base and for continued representation, presence in the region? >> it is possible, but it does not
of lives, syria's only friends in the world have been naturally iran and china but also their best friends, russia. russia. and that was true until today. russia today did not formally declare that they're no longer going to support the syrian government against the rebels, but for the first time a high-ranking russian official said publicly that yeah, it looks like assad is going to lose this war. i mean, the united states has been saying that forever. nato has been saying that forever. everybody who wants assad to go has been saying that forever. you try to create an air of inevitability about the thing you want to happen. right? that makes sense. but now for the other side to be saying it, for syria's best friend to be saying yeah, syria, you're going to lose this, it's going to happen, that is a huge, huge deal. it is sometimes hard to follow the day-to-day news out of this war, to know what is an important day and what is just another awful day. but this is a really important moment. because syria was sort of down to their last friend in the world. and if they are now down to not even
, the biggest companies without a doubt in the world moving jobs out of china. bringing them back to america. apple c eo tim cook with this announcement. >> so we've been working for years on doing more and more in the united states. next year, one of the existing mac lines in the united states. >> existing mac lines. dan simons, you cover things technology here. apple's been under pressure to move production back here, back to the u.s. why now? >> reporter: well, you know, they've been under pressure to do this for sometime. something to do with the human rights an i buss in the plants and here's an opportunity to give back, you know, something to the american economy. the way you look at things is, you know, the company is going to be spending $100 million in terms of bringing back jobs to the u.s. some may say $100 million, you know, is not a lot of money considering that apple has more than $100 billion in the bank. but i think this is a positive sign in terms of how many workers we're talking about here -- >> how many jobs? >> reporter: we don't know precisely or the skills necessary. i
and terrifying video out of shanghai, china. 33-ton shark tank exploded sending sharks flying everywhere and shoppers running for their lives. at least four people were in front of the tank when it cracked as you saw there. 16 people suffered cuts and bruises, nobody was seriously hurt. three lemon sharks died. officials are investigating whether cold temperatures along with shoddy design may have caused this. >> i'm not sure this gives you the story you want. i got bit by a shark in front of the gap. >> shanghai known for its rigorous building standards. >> i love shanghai but this is always the criticism. is everything built right because it looks good. >> fabulous city but a little shoddy in some of the standards. >> that's a weird story. >> i've never heard of that happening. >> never before. we cover a lot of crazy stories. >>> one of the crazy stories we cover on cnn is the fiscal cliff. we'll wait to see if a critical meeting at the white house will prevent us from falling over the fiscal cliff. congressional leaders meet with president obama and vice president biden if hopes of c
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
with nerve gas. that's not a good place for even russia and china to be at the end of the day, jon. jon: want to turn your attention to pearl harbor day, general. it is, it is upon us again. i just wanted to get your thoughts on this day. >> you know, in a way we can look at pearl harbor as a sort of cautionary tale, jon. over the last 70 or 80 years, this nation has almost always been surprised by our enemies, whether it's nerve, pearl harbor and the other various -- korea, all the various wars we've gone to. and as a nation what's important here is to prevent wars by being prepared for wars. and not to try to pick any particular region of the world to anticipate when, where, how and why a conflict will be started. we're not very good at that as a nation, jon. jon: let's hope we can learn. general bob scales, good to have you on. >> thank you, jon. heather: we are getting a new snapshot of the health of the economy right now. according to the labor department, unemployment fell to 7.7% in november after adding 146,000 jobs last month. but the dip in the jobless rate due mostly to the fact th
taxpayers' dollars, the steel came from china. what are we doing to america and what are we doing to our manufacturing? i think we need a wake-up call. we're busy holding up the entire congress, protecting tax breaks for billionaires. when are we going to start looking out for american jobs? when we're talking about this fiscal cliff, we're not talking about having a jobs component in it. when are we going to start talking about tax breaks so we can have an infrastructure bank, so we can rebuild america using american products. and why is it when they say you want it made in america, they call us protectionist. well, i welcome the call of protection. i want to protect american jobs. i don't want them on a slow boat to china or a fast track to mexico. i might not ever get my steel mill back. baltimore might not ever have those jobs back but, you know, we've got to get serious in our country, what are our priorities. we have to start rewarding those industries that make products in this country. right now our whole code is oriented to protecting people who make money off of money. well, le
of obesity compared to children born vaginally. researchers in china looked at previous studies on obesity and thousands of births and say that health risks must be taken seriously. previous studies linked c-section births to allergies and diabetes later in life. we found one guy on our staff delivered c-section and is one of the fittest guys on our staff. >> he weighed ten pounds at the time. big baby. >> he's buff. not overweight. >>> in other news, marriage is good for people. gay and straight in fact. that's the finding of a new study. it shows same-sex couples married enjoy the same psychological benefits as heterosexual couples. more from abc senior medical contributor. >> reporter: as same-sex couples wait to hear what the supreme court says about their marrying, a study in the american journal of public health has already offered an opinion. the study looked at data from the 2009 california health interview survey, which included 47,000 participants, both men and women, ages 18 to 70, and both homosexuals and heterosexuals. the authors say married gay, lesbian and bisexual people h
as in china we went and helped people in small businesses that have been wiped out temporarily to be able to come back, our fishing people deserve emergency assistance to tide them over and help them through this most critical time. i would turn to the senator from alaska and the senator from new hampshire, and ask what that means to the state of new hampshire if she might share with us. mrs. shaheen: my friend from massachusetts understands the challenges we have in new hampshire, as does senator whitehouse from rhode island, because, in fact, fishing is one of the oldest industries that we have in new england. and new hampshire it dates back over 400 years. because we have a much smaller coastline than massachusetts and rhode island, we have a smaller -- smaller group of people who earn their living through fishing, but they have smaller boats, and therefore they're more affected by some of the fishing regulations and some of the adverse weather conditions that have affected fishing. about 90% of the fishing that new hampshire's fishermen do is for cod and cod is the species that has be
in tomorrow and said get everybody out of china and do whatever you have to do, make these, make everything you make in the united states. what would that do to the price of this device? >> honestly, it's not so much about price, it's about the skills et cetera. over time, there are skills that are associated with manufacturing that have left the u.s. not necessarily people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty p
with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more this functional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson- bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. point two, and this is one of the things where i think those of
rights violators wherever they might be, whether in russia or syria or sudan or north korea or china or any other country. in other words, the senate committee-approved bill wisely adopted a global magnitsky standard. the reasoning for this is sound. because while the mechanism of u.s. visa denial for human rights violators was inspired by a single case in a single nation, the principles that it seeks to advance are universal. this bipartisan committee bill, unlike the house-passed version of the magnitsky act that we will soon vote on, does not single out russian human rights violators for visa denial but would apply the visa denial mechanism to people from any country who violate important human rights standards. the united states should be clear and firm in its commitment to protecting human rights. wherever the violation occur. and to holding those who violate those rights accountable to the best of our ability. including denying them visas to come to our country. human rights do not end at the borders of russia and anyone who violates those standards as so many did so blatantly
video of a dramatic rcue in china. a young woman getting money from an atm machine is grabbed from behind and then a knife is put to her throat. there you see it. you can see the man holding her. a special unit of police and professional negotiators dispatched immediately to the scene after two hours finally able to take him down. wow. patti ann: the u.s. government is the nation's largest assett holder managing nearly 900,000 buildings and 640 million acres of land. in short hundreds of billions worth of assets that it could sell off to pay down the national debt. some say it's time for the government to start selling. william la jeunesse is live with that story for us. >> reporter: when trying to reduce federal spending any single line item is either diminished as a droop in the bucket or praised at ever penny count. although no individual program will solve this budget crisis what to peel do when money is tight, when you're already borrowing money for every dollar you spend? you raise money with a garage sale. from state-owned businesses like amtrak to vacant buildings like thes
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)